Readers, Before You Go Any Further: Some White Muslim to White Muslim Advise

–because we know that you love advice.

Not So Yummy Business

Although the White Privilege and The Ummah Blog Carnival has barely just begun, I see plenty of people coming by to show some interest and some folks already stepping in it as they say. While you patiently wait for the rest of the posts, inshallah, please give some attention to the the work of these folks who have already spent considerable time contemplating and actively working to eradicate racism and unearned privilege; we can learn a great deal from them and don’t have to repeat all the nonsense that is already repeated ad nauseam:

Racism 101 from Resist Racism is a fine place to start.  “#2 Sanctuary is not segregation” is worthy of contemplating as we certainly see enough of this in the Ummah. Consider why– from a new angle — one neighborhood has 3-4 masjids. We will also see plenty of #9, and it’s good to keep in mind that just because one is married to a person of color, one has not been absolved of all their privilege and tendencies to wield it: “#9 A claim to anti-racism cannot be made based on any variation of the “black friend defense” (Mexican boyfriend, Asian wife, children of color, etc.).” Number 13 is one that I am currently grappling with as I had hoped that the Mozzies could have a bit more patience for each other, but I fully respect this assertion and am better and better coming to understand it’s necessity: “#13 People of color are not responsible for the education of white people.” To better understand #13, you really, really should read The Helplessness of White People.

And before you make any comments, print out a copy of We Heard It Before and keep it within sight while reading all the carnival entries–or at least read it! Again, we’ve only just begun and we’ve have already seen #2, #4, #6, #9, #14 and #16. Some of this will be unavoidable as we are not social scientists, we are talking about personal experiences and observations–BUT–your experience does not make you an authority, nor does it negate reality–White privilege exists. Reading the comments to the Resist Racism posts will also give you some luminous pearls.

Initially, I had intended for this carnival to be open to only Muslimas (from all backgrounds) as I was concerned that gender issues would further complicate the sensitive but necessary issue of white privilege, but since brothers have shown an interest, then here is an opportunity to take a closer look at some of your stuff. White male college instructor Steven P. Scacht uses McIntosh’s popular backpack to further illustrate the workings of male privilege.  I particular feel #19 as it is still fresh in my mind from-err-last week:

“#19. When attending school I can often count on the teacher (he or she) to perceive my inquiries and presence as more important than the females that are in attendance.” (if you prefer to skim, please at least read his list at the bottom of his article).

A word about generalizing: Obviously not ALL white people do _____ actions ALL the time or even SOME times or EVEN ever. Do not assume that “white people” means ALL white people including you–though it probably means a whole lot of them 🙂

“[S]urely Allah does not change the condition of a people until they change their own condition”

How could I leave out Racialicious!? Go there too.

Love and Peace, for real, for the sake of Allah.

Advertisements

29 thoughts on “Readers, Before You Go Any Further: Some White Muslim to White Muslim Advise

  1. Salaam Alaikum,

    While I think the above is pretty good advice, I think it’s only natural, that when filtered through the medium of blog, posts will be personal, subjective and all about the writer. Therefore most posts will at least break rules 14 and 15 of the rule 101 quoted above.

    Also, I’m not sure how entirely helpful race 101 rules are in setting that mix race and religion. Take for example rule 13:

    “People of color are not responsible for the education of white people”.

    Fair enough when talking about race and racism.

    However, when talking about Islam and particularly about converts, the fact is that the convert does need educating. and as most Muslims are people of colour, the person in a position to educate them probably will be a person of colour.

    I get the point behind your post, but it does smack a little of hand slapping because people haven’t written what you think they should.

    1. Walaikum Salam Sis,

      I did try to clarify about “posts will be personal, subjective and all about the writer” when I said, “Some of this will be unavoidable as we are not social scientists, we are talking about personal experiences and observations–BUT–your experience does not make you an authority, nor does it negate reality.”

      I also specifically addressed #13 “Number 13 is one that I am currently grappling with as I had hoped that the Mozzies could have a bit more patience for each other, but I fully respect this assertion and am better and better coming to understand it’s necessity.”

      I don’t think other Muslims are responsible to teach me my deen; it is my responsibility to seek out knowledge. Rule #13 exists because that position is so widespread amongst whites and I see it as related if a white Muslim expects a Muslim of color to educate them about racism and white privilege. Isn’t that asking alot when clearly we are able to attain this knowledge on our own?

      This post is really directed at readers: “While you patiently wait for the rest of the posts” and “And before you make any comments” much more than it is the bloggers who are really putting themselves out there to initiate this discourse.

  2. Salaam Alaikum,

    Thank you for the clarification.

    I agree that we have to seek knowledge, but every seeker of knowledge needs a teacher too. Plus, Muslims do have an obligation to help those new to the religion, this is in the religion, hence underlining my point on how race and religion intersect, but don’t necessarily correlate.

    I do think that white privilege can make the the process of having to seek knowledge a more uncomfortable one, as it is if often a switch in roles.

    Going slightly off topic

    The more I think about it, the more the different power struggles within the Ummah interest me. With the convert issue, while white privilege exists and is definitely under explored, there is the other issue of the vulnerability of converts.

    Actually, getting back to point 13, what intrigues me is how often Muslims silence each other. There is the familiar “Haraam/ bidah” trope, but also the “Only Allah can judge” blocking move. There are so many different techniques used to shame, gain superiority. I’ll email you an interesting example of this in action, insha Allah.

  3. ” And if you take offense and cannot recover gracefully, then maybe you aren’t ready to participate effectively in this topic.”

    Assalamu alaikum, I feel I’m really struggling with this and I tried to address this in my post, and perhaps I shoulda read this before spending too hours tonight writing my post *smile* (oops). At any rate, feel free to reject my post if it’s ungracefulness personified…

    1. Ginny – Too much? (I said that with the same concerned look Wanda Sykes made) I’ve seen so many conversations in the Ummah and general blogoshere derailed by asinine commentry and trollery that I’m trying my best to take preemeptive measures. I suspect your submission will be dazzling, in that good suspicious kind of way–can there be good suspicion? 🙂

  4. Walaikum Asalam Safiya – Yes, perhaps we have failed to find someone who is already addressing these problems OR their work hasn’t been translated 😦 I have experienced the blocking move with regards to this wp topic–I think I may even be blocking myself!

    The issue of the vulnerability of all converts is a topic that just cannot get to those who need it the most fast enough. It further complicates this issue because we are all aware of the highly sought after (often new) white Muslima (except for her of course!), but we don’t look very closely at what happens after the walima–if she even gets one. I had hoped someone would tackle that topic.

  5. Assalamu alaikum, well, I didn’t tackle that topic because lol, it didn’t happen to me. Some sisters said I “needed to get married”, or “Inshallah one day you’ll get married” but it was said in a dismissive kinda way, like “honestly now, you actually think *you*, could get married”, in the same kinda way my non-Muslim (I’m ht eonly Muslim in my family) grandmother very loudly asked me at my brother’s wedding reception if I was going to “fix it” / have surgery to prevent myself fromhaving children, because, well, you’re blind aren’t you, how or why would you or could you, possibly want children? I mean, how would you be able to take care of them? So you see, yes I have white privilege, I understand that, however, the kind of discrimination and stereotypes that I face as a totally blind person are vastly different than the discrimination face by people of color and the two can’t be compared! I used to think they could, but you have two completely different dynamics at work, I think, though don’t quote me on it because I’ve not completely hashed all of this out in my head either. Perhaps what the “resist racism” blog was trying to keep white people from doing was from saying something like “oh I’m disabled so I feel your pain/I udnerstand what you go through as a POC”, etc., however, I didn’t take it that way, I saw it as a completely dismissive, flippant, sarcastic dismissal (sorry same word that and dismissive) to all white people who happen to be disabled, as if we don’t face ableism, blind-ism, lol, or any other kind of discrimination based on our disability and that by being white, we’re not even supposed to mention that in talking about discrimination in general. Because whether or not you’re talking about racial discrimination or discrimination based on disability, you’re talking about negative perceptions about people, that are based on stereotypes that are pretty much untrue. And I just felt that in trying to right one wrong that many white people commit, myself included sadly, the Resist Racism blog committed another wrong, in completely dismissing the concerns, the experiences, and the discrimination faced by people with disabilities, especially white people. Because we have our own set of fo-pahs that people make, one I can think of right off the top of my head being”I have a blind friend” or “my mom is blind”, etc., which makes a sighted person think that they understand me/know what I need / can speak for me, etc. So maybe the same sorts of dynamics are at workw hen dealign with any kind of “other” whether it be racial, disabled, or religion.

    Anyway, am writing in a hurry, I think I may try to post this on my blog. Maybe… As I said, I feel really vulnerable, going out on a libm like this because I tend not to take criticism very well, though I’m working on that.

  6. 10. Should I decide to rape a woman in my quest to feel superior, I can rest assured that it is highly unlikely that she will report my misogynist criminal activity to the police. If, however, I should incur the unfortunate charge of rape, unlike any other crime, I can count on my accuser’s life and status to simultaneously be on trial to determine if she is worthy of being named my “victim.”

    Another way of putting this is “someone could rape my sister/mother/daughter and count on getting away with it”. Even though it’s not true (rapists actually do get caught and punished), how is that a privilege, exactly?

    1. Yusuf – This is what is called “derailing.” You have twisted the content of that example to fit your own fancy and have seemingly misunderstood the pov of the author. I won’t respond to stuff like this. I suggest you reread what his example says and paraphrase it (to yourself) this is an excellent reading comprehension tool.

  7. “10. Should I decide to rape a woman in my quest to feel superior, I can rest assured that it is highly unlikely that she will report my misogynist criminal activity to the police. If, however, I should incur the unfortunate charge of rape, unlike any other crime, I can count on my accuser’s life and status to simultaneously be on trial to determine if she is worthy of being named my “victim.”

    Another way of putting this is “someone could rape my sister/mother/daughter and count on getting away with it”. Even though it’s not true (rapists actually do get caught and punished), how is that a privilege, exactly?”

    Oh dear, Yusuf… Perhaps Brooke won’t respond to this, but I feel compelled to… No one is saying that *no one* gets caught and punished for rape (does anyone actually believe that that was what point 10 was trying to say?)

    Let me try to break it down for you and sorry Brooke for hijacking your comments. But as a victim of sexual assault, who admittedly will be less likely to report such crimes again, if God forbid they ever happen to me again… Let me try to explain this…

    “Should I decide to rape a woman in my quest to feel superior, I can rest assured that it is highly unlikely that she will report my misogynist criminal activity to the police.”

    Statistics show that the majority of rapes/sexual assaults go unreported, because women have to go through so much in reporting them and the emotioan trauma of having to go through a criminal proceeding is often as bad as the actual assault itself. I can testify to that and my criminal case was only in juvenile court, and the defense attorney of the guy who assaulted me tried to make me out to be some little liar who was just trying to get back at the next boy who came along, out of revenge for the one who actually assaulted me, I mean, I was blind after all, so how do or did I know for sure that it was “him”? The sound of his voice wasn’t good enough, the fact taht I heard him coming down the hall, talking to someone else, and the next thing I knew, he was there, Meant nothing. My blindness gave enough reasonable doubt and if it wasn’t that, it’d have been something else. Maybe it was the fact that I wear a skirt instead of jeans thta day, or maybe it was how I was walking, maybe it was thta I was walking alone, who knows, however, the defense attorney had all he needed with my blindness, to create reasonable doubt with the judge, though he said after the trial thta he believed that the guy had done it, it’s just that he felt that my lack of sight, which obviously prevented me from identifying him, created too much “reasonable doubt” from a legal standpoint, to have found him guilty. But I digress.

    “If, however, I should incur the unfortunate charge of rape, unlike any other crime, I can count on my accuser’s life and status to simultaneously be on trial to determine if she is worthy of being named my “victim.”

    Often in rape trials, the woman’s lifestyle, the way she dressed, her sexual proclivities, etc., are brought out as a way to negate the actual crime. And you hear this sorta sentiment expressed all the time, the “if she didn’t dress that way then that wouldn’t have happened to her” or “if she wasn’t so promiscuous then she wouldn’t have been raped”, it’s the whole “she asked for it mentality”, or the idea that because she dressed in a what is deemed to be a provocative way, then she deserved what she got and couldn’t possibly be viewed as rape because if she didn’t want it she’d not have dressed that way in the first place.

    So God forbid if your sister were raped and she even went to the police in the first place, and the case actually went to trial, count on the defense attorney to try to make her out to be a liar, mentally unstable, pick apart her life style, i.e., how she dressed, the way she was dressed the day of the attack, her sex life, how many boyfriends she might have had, and if she had an affair if she were married/committed, etc. Anything to demean the crime, and thus lessen any sentence that the perpetrator would get, if he even gets a sentence in the first place.
    Yusuf, your complete lack of understanding, whether or not it’s actual or just because you want to make a point, is mind-boggling, and I can’t believe that I wasted half of my lunch hour to write this comment out. But as I said, I felt compelled to. I just have no more words, this kind of reaction is just so, well, I want to say unbelievable, but perhaps I shouldn’t be surprised. Most men don’t get it just like most white people don’t get it. Or most sighted people for that matter. All right Brooke, my apologies, you can ahve your comments back now.

  8. I left a comment on the post ‘We heard it before’, it said

    “ok, I should obviously have read this before bothering making my comment on the other post. It seems that referring to one’s biracial children or non-white husband is a big mistake and worthy of mocking. this would be understandable if it was said in a context along the lines of
    “I know what it is like to be non-white because….” or “I’m in a position to understand this issue as much as you because….”
    but grappling to understand more about racism because of how it affects your own household directly is negative and shameful.
    Why? Because it acts as a catalyst for action? At least something is that catalyst. Does it mean that a person remains so small minded that they only seek or want change for their own children, but not the world at large? I doubt it.

    Some parts of this list come across as intending to disable proper communication. It’s a way of saying “shut up, don’t be comfortable expressing your thoughts or trying to approach us on this matter, because you know nothing, be uncomfortable, you will never be as uncomfortable as you have made us.”

    It strikes me as being quite a patriarchal way of dealing with things. ie. you can only come here or speak with us if you do it in the manner we prescribe is acceptable, there can be no meeting ground of languages, we set the terms and if you don’t meet them you are stupid.

    So be it, but it is a shame. If I don’t want to continue talking on these terms, does that mean it’s just because I’m out of my comfort zone and I want to scuttle back? I don’t think so, I simply know from experience that there is no point in trying to hold a conversation unless it is mutually respectful. That doesn’t mean stifling or repressing legitimate anger but nor does it mean trying to control or stifle the language of the person speaking to you, because when that occurs no one will hear what is being said.”

    Yes, there was some good advice on that list, but some of the points presented as they were in such a general manner with no explanation of negative context, came across as purposefully disabling.

    A question about generalization, why is it that it IS generalizing if you make a comment in which it is said, ‘Black people are…’, ‘Women are’, ‘Mentally ill people are’, ‘Muslims are..’, but it is not generalizing if you say ‘White people are…’? By all means say it, what is being said may even be true for the most part, but it is still a generalization.

    Forgive me for not wanting to have this conversation if it means I must have it wearing a straightjacket…and yes, I know, I could say that about almost any other discussion and it would be ok, but this is a topic that doesn’t seem to demand mutual respect simply for the sake of conversation. Perhaps I’m out of it not being American, but Australia is one of the most racist countries on earth, and I really don’t feel, when I have these conversations here, that I must stifle my own responses in the way that is being expected here.

    Yes, I am pregnant, I also have a brain 😉

  9. ‘I see it as related if a white Muslim expects a Muslim of color to educate them about racism and white privilege. Isn’t that asking alot when clearly we are able to attain this knowledge on our own?’

    what is really meant by “expecting to educate?”. If it’s meant that a white person just sits back and does nothing, using it as an excuse to remain ignorant because supposedly no one has come and told them otherwise, well yes that is obviously ridiculous.

    But if it is meant that we can’t expect to talk to POC about these things, because we really should be finding out for ourselves and they don’t owe us anything. what is the point in that? Books, university courses, blogs, articles only go so far. it’s talking with people that makes the difference.

    Learning something like theory can be done in books, hence your example of learning the deen, if it is “dry” stuff that we are talking about, but really learning what it is like to be a Muslim, in a sociological sense requires talking with Muslims. Would you really be comfortable with a researcher who wrote about Muslim women but didn’t actually bother to talk to any, because she had read about Muslim women?

  10. ‘Perhaps what the “resist racism” blog was trying to keep white people from doing was from saying something like “oh I’m disabled so I feel your pain/I udnerstand what you go through as a POC”, etc., however, I didn’t take it that way, I saw it as a completely dismissive, flippant, sarcastic dismissal (sorry same word that and dismissive) to all white people who happen to be disabled, as if we don’t face ableism, blind-ism, lol, or any other kind of discrimination based on our disability and that by being white, we’re not even supposed to mention that in talking about discrimination in general.’

    I just read your response Ginny, and I totally agree, it actually made me so annoyed that I couldn’t sleep…and I’m not even disabled.

  11. I am so glad that I didn’t cite the radical women of color blogs for sources. whew. okay, I gotta get The Post together and then–I dunno–but maybe I’ll get back over here.
    Love and Peace and as Asiya said:
    “it’s talking with people that makes the difference” so do that, k?

  12. It is an unfortunate thing that conversations of this kind quickly break down into this highly doctrinaire “you’re doing it wrong” kind of vibe. The idea of holding onto some list and using that to grade the posts of the people participating is just a bit put-offish. We’re not taking a college course here, most of us anyway, and we’re not looking for an A on the paper. So yeah, I’m nodding along with Asiya here and hoping nobody will refuse to engage anybody else simply because they don’t have an “enlightened” enough position on the topic.

  13. Salaams!

    Ah, see? This carnival is working already! I think Brooke is learning valuable lessons here 🙂

    When I started discussing white privilege with people, I was often left scratching my head. I soon learned that I was so privileged, even if I didn’t feel privileged due to being an “other” with white skin. I must admit that I still scratch my head at times in an attempt to continue to grow and understand.

    About POC not being responsible to teach white people – well, on some level this is correct. But I think that if a white person truly wants to understand and truly wants to change, why not help him/her out by having open dialogue? Instead, it’s like “you have a problem, but figure it out yourself, you’re on your own.” Isn’t that a little arrogant on some level? The white person is damned if they do, damned if they don’t. Sometimes people need a little help unpacking the knapsack.

  14. Brooke, the fact that they chose not to publish my comments, (and I left a lengthy one on the helplessness post, that I didn’t paste over here, and it was very polite and genuinely enquiring, I wrote it before reading the ‘We’ve heard it all before’ thing)…shows that some people are not interested in talking, unless of course you are in complete agreement and act like a grovelling dog.

  15. just wanted to add that I am not someone who is averse to looking at my own mistakes or seeing my own privilege or even my own racism. I don’t purposefully hold any racist thoughts, but I don’t doubt that I have some, simply because I grew up in an all white environment (Tasmania is/was almost entirely anglo-saxon).

    But ultimately I don’t think anything can be gained from trying to engage with people who don’t want to be engaged with, unless they recreate and reverse the balance of power that they have been dealt through racism. ie.you treat us like crap and infantilize us, therefore we will do the same to you, you are not worth the discussion. I won’t engage with anybody on those terms, because there is no possible, positive outcome.

  16. Assalamu alaikum, I agree with Safiyyah here, it seems as white people who understand that we have white privilege and are trying to come to terms with it/understand it/dismantle it, we’re told we have it but there’s nothing we can do about it, and that the frustration and anger that comes with being put in such a situation that you didn’t ask for and seemingly can’t do anything about is just “some sorta white guilt”, so no matter what we do, we’re looked down upon, mocked, etc., and for me anyway, it makes me feel very powerless. OK, so I know I have white privilege, though as I said, it’s hard sometimes for me to see it, but I’m trying, so given that I understand that, given that I understand that racism is still such an engrained part of our society, what do I, as a white person, do? According to this Resist Racism blog, nothing, and not only nothing, I should just shut up, and go off into a corner somewhere, and just expect that I’m white, and thus inherently bad/racist/evil, etc., and no amount of discimination that I’ve ever faced in my life means anything because I’m white, thus it’s insignificant. Wow, I’m sure glad the EEOC didn’t take this line of thought when I filed my discrimination complaint against a potential employer, or the supportive people in my life didn’t act this way when the guy who sexually assaulted me was found not guilty because I couldn’t identify him by sight. I’m glad they didn’t say “oh get over it, you’re white so the justice system automatically favors you anyway”, yeah, it does, however, I’m blind to, so whatever “privilege” that I had in that case anyway, was taken away because of my blindness. See where these sorts of things intersect? I think the blog meant well, because I tend to belive the best of people, however, it’s the dismissive attitude of other “isms” and other forms of discrimination, except for racial, of course, that really bothres me. And I also think that Brooke meant well in posting the above list. I think we’re all trying to learn and grow and become better people.

  17. ‘so no matter what we do, we’re looked down upon, mocked, etc., and for me anyway, it makes me feel very powerless.’

    Ginny, I believe that that is a purposeful move on their part, turning the cards so to speak.

    It has made me think about the limited aspects of “activism”. People can become very limited in their thinking and the group mentality fuels a kind of false fire. In other words, people get stuck, it doesn’t matter what the form of activism is, frequently it causes division and exclusive behaviour.

    In the past I have tried to involve myself in groups that are involved with things of importance to me, such as mental illness support groups. What ends up putting me off is how narrow the perspective of the people involved often becomes, there is nothing above and beyond this issue.

    So really, in terms of querying how to address our own white privilige, going to groups looking for info, online or not, is not going to help, as groups frequently foster and encourage division.

    the response from some individuals in our own communities however, may be very different. Of course there will be people who want nothing to do with us, but there are likely to be genuine people too, who recognise the sincerity to learn, however naieve it may be. And who are able to reign in their anger a bit, in order to understand that division helps none of us in the end, even though it may make us feel temporarily better or empowered.

    I keep coming back to my own experience as a young person trying to come to terms with my Mother’s schizophrenia and my own depression, how generally angry with the world I was. How much I hated people who didn’t understand, and how much I wanted them to feel as disempowered as I felt. Anger was a temporary release, as was hanging around with others in similiar predicaments and feeling “better than” all the “mediocre” people who surrounded us. I can’t see it in any other way than behaviour caused by feeling like a victim (and being one of course). But of course to draw any kind of analogy like this is to just be waving my white privilige flag.

    My thoughts now are to thoroughly avoid the world of “activism” whatever shape it takes, although that’s not to say there are really good people doing beneficial things.

  18. brooke u have indeed opened a real can of worms here because some of your white readers are at different places in their education and understanding of white privilege.

    same with some readers of color; i also saw on Get Outline’s post the comment of a reader of color who isn’t familiar with anti-racism rhetoric and she blamed communal divisions and racism on not following Islam.

    the problem here is that these people don’t really have a “clue” and are in early stages of understanding white privilege and racism or maybe they don’t know anything about the issues.

    this is hard and i see in the comments things have taken a sad nose dive, but that is gonna happen. doesn’t it happen when we talk about racism with our families, friends, fellow Muslims, and they don’t know about the issues? u are doing your part in helping out, educating other whites, airing issues for Muslims of color, getting the clueless a clue, even if it is just a first step towards a clue.

    so you are working for social justice and doing something proactive…good one you. remember that for every white whine you get here, the person has at least thought more about white privilege and I suspect will be provoked into thinking about it more, even if they sound clueless now.

    i am looking forward to the posts in the carnival.

    peace.

  19. Lucky Fatima,

    Considering I have left most of the comments here, I have to assume that your comment is partially directed at myself. So in the interests in improving my lot as a white whine, maybe you can clarify some things! Please take this in a friendly way, I’m laughing at myself not having a go at you or your comment.

    Comparatively speaking white people have nothing to complain about, I understand that, so is that your point? that we shouldn’t be bothered with being defensive, in the face of much larger issues?

    The thing is, my feeling all along is that being patronized or at the brunt of sarcasm, doesn’t help me to be educated. It’s not helping, you may feel momentarily better for having voiced your frustration over the responses of the clueless, but it doesn’t stop the clueless being any less clueless.

    It would be much more helpful to be told why one is clueless, why one’s comments are stupid, especially if someone is enlightened enough to not be clueless themself!

  20. For my own part, let me say that any criticism about the early tone of the carnival was directed at Brooke (intended and I hope received as constructive white muslim to white muslim advice), not the Resist Racism site which I’ve never visited. Specifically, I was concerned that the Checklist of Truth would be used to judge rather than engage participants. <a href="http://archive.uua.org/ga/ga99/238thandeka.html"Anti-racism initiatives coming from white people to white people can fail if they are too doctrinaire. That’s all I’m saying. I hope the reams and reams of electrons I’ve arranged over at my site reassures Brooke that I value this conversation highly and appreciate her efforts, because I do.

  21. BG-I’m not sure if you mean checklist of truth as in that one “trustworthy” topic suggestion of mine (actually, I broke rule #13 and a friend suggested that one), or the rules as I cut and pasted from Resist Racism. And whyyy haven’t you clicked my links, but you are dropping links of your own here, hmm? Actually, Resist Racism seems to be very effective as you can see if you read through the comments. I can see how the sarcasm would be very off-putting, but I just read around it.
    If it doesn’t show, let it be known–I do appreciate your contributions to this convo, thanks.

  22. The Carnival is going great and it’s water under the bridge. Maybe I was being defensive. Fwiw, I think the advice post would have done better to come out after the carnival was up, but you addressed that in your comment upthread, so whatever.

    Also, I didn’t check out your link because I had heard of the carnival after just coming fresh out of two marathon anti-racism threads at Metafilter, a non-muslim board I hang out on, and didn’t feel like I needed any additional homework, not because of any beef with the resist racism site, their list in and of itself, or its tone.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s